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Meditations on Tevin Washington, and Being a GT Fan These Days

This is a discussion on Meditations on Tevin Washington, and Being a GT Fan These Days within the Georgia Tech Football forums, part of the Georgia Tech Sports Message Boards category; In 2000, the Baltimore Ravens fielded one of the best defenses in the history of the NFL. The Ravens held ...

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    Meditations on Tevin Washington, and Being a GT Fan These Days

    In 2000, the Baltimore Ravens fielded one of the best defenses in the history of the NFL. The Ravens held their opponents to an NFL record 970 rushing yards (60.6 yards) that still stands today. Even with an all-time great defense, the Ravens barely made the playoffs that season as a wildcard entrant. The “problem” with the Ravens that season is the offense was uneven at best, and their starting QB, Trent Dilfer was a lightening rod for criticism. With one of the best RBs of his generation (Jamal Lewis) and a Hall of Fame tight end (Shannon Sharpe), the Ravens offense still sputtered along every week. The criticism of and Dilfer and the offense got so bad, it led the Raven’s talisman and superstar linebacker, Ray Lewis, to say “We don’t need Trent Dilfer to be an elite quarterback. If Trent can lead our offense to 14 points, we (the defense) will win the game because we have an elite defense” during an interview before the playoffs. True to Lewis’s word, the Raven’s defense held their playoff opponents to 3 points (21-3 win against Broncos), 10 points (24-10 win against the Titans), 3 points (16-3 win against the Raiders), and 7 points (34-7 Super Bowl win over the Giants).

    Down 28-35 in the fourth quarter last Saturday, WR Jeff Green streaked down the field wide open. Tevin Washington saw Green then proceeded to under throw him. Although the ball was underthrown, Green still had the opportunity to make a play and help Tevin. Instead, the ball bounced off his hands, popped in the air, and led to an interception. A few plays later, Middle Tennessee’s offense would score and take 42-28 lead on us. Ball game.

    As I witnessed Tevin’s under throw to Green, I said to myself “Well, if that play doesn’t summarize Tevin’s GT career, I’m not sure any play does.” Just good enough to get there, but still requires help from a teammate to finish it off. That’s the crux of Tevin’s time at QB. Statistically, he’ll go down as a very good QB at GT, and as a good option QB in college football. But stats are cheap if it doesn’t lead to wins. The reality is GT is now 2-3. Unlike Trent Dilfer and the Ravens, Tevin doesn’t have an outstanding defense to lean on during times like Saturday when the offense scored 28 points which should be enough to win against a low level FBS team. Who on our offense should our opponents really be scared of? There’s no Demaryius Thomas, Jonathan Dwyer, Calvin Johnson, etc. It’s pretty much just Tevin right now, and if other guys on offense don’t help him out, and if our defense doesn’t play well, we are in trouble. When it’s 3rd/4th and long, is anyone really scared of Jeff Green/Darren Waller or Robby Godhigh/Orwin Smith running routes? Does anyone really feel safe with a lead of any kind against our defense anymore?

    I think it’s unfortunate that when we look back on Tevin’s career, we’ll think of games like Middle Tennessee, and Miami and how embarrassing those losses were. He’s represented us well, the guys on the team look at him as one of the leaders of the team, and he’s doing all he can to help the team on the field. Yet, his athletic limitations are evident, and even more obvious because it’s all on him right now and there’s not much to help him out on offense or defense.

    - - - - -

    I started following GT sports when I was in elementary school. I’m not from a family deeply rooted in athletics, so I had to discover the love for sports on my own. By the grace of God my new love of sports coincidentally dovetailed at the same time as GT’s Championship run under Bobby Ross and Shawn Jones, and during Bobby Cremins’s and Kenny Anderson’s run to the Final Four. All of my immediate family members went to GT (hence my name…AllGT), but none of them are avid GT sports fans like myself. My love of GT sports was strengthened through thousands of hours in the backyard pretending I was Shawn Jones throwing to stationary targets, and countless hours shooting basketballs under the driveway lights pretending I was Kenny Anderson.

    I’ve seen the highs (1990 National Championship) and the lows (the Bill Lewis era) when I was young. For the most part, GT football program has had reasonable success since then. Yet, throughout it all, there has always been one missing ingredient. During the O’Leary years, we had a championship caliber offense led by one of the best QBs in college football history, Joe Hamilton, and an offensive genius in Ralph Friedgen. During the Gailey years, we had one of the most gifted WRs to ever grace the field on any level, Calvin Johnson, but not the QB to take advantage of it. We also had a pretty good defense during Gailey’s years with Tenuta, but a below average offense. Gailey sent bushels of players to the NFL, yet none of it translated on the field at GT outside of the 2006 season.

    Now, we have someone that is widely considered as one of the best offensive tacticians in college football. Paul Johnson’s offense is so widely admired that coaches like Bill Belicheck and Urban Meyer are known to have picked his brains at one time. CPJ has spawned a cottage flexbone industry in coaching tapes, clinics, and message boards devoted to his offense. Yet, again, something is missing. We just can’t seem to attract the top tier athtletes that could take our offense from pretty good, to elite. Because GT is so known for CPJ and his offenses, when we lose like we did against Miami and Middle Tennessee, his offense is somehow blamed for it. That’s fair. Paul Johnson is getting paid to be the HEAD COACH, and not the offensive coordinator.

    What I’m trying to say, and the point I’m trying to make is this is how it is to be a GT fan these days. SOMETHING is always missing. If our strengths aren’t strong enough to overcome our weaknesses, days like Miami and Middle Tennessee happen. Are we living in the past? I became a GT fan during some golden times, but the landscape of modern sports has changed. Schools like GT can be good, but because of the various things which are too long and detailed to get into at the moment, things have to “dovetail” just right for us to be elite. We’re smack dab is the middle of one of the most recruiting rich areas in the nation, and we can’t take advantage of it. We’re an elite institution that attracts some of the top students in the world, but elite athletes that are elite students are few and far between. We’re located in one of the signature cities in the US with plenty of internship and post graduate opportunities, but somehow that’s a negative for recruiting. We have some of the best facilities in all of college sports, yet even our own students don’t appreciate it.

    All the ingredients are there, but SOMETHING is always missing…
    Last edited by AllGT; 10-01-2012 at 12:49 PM.


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    Great read man, GT sports have always been like my golf game, I never have all facets working and because of that I can't shoot below a 76-80.

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    the VPI game was a stunning heartbreaker. the miami game was a jaw-dropping, disappointment. the MTSU game was a stinking, steaming, pile of monumental embarrassment.

    this is year 5. losses like saturday's should NOT be happening to this program. totally inexcusable. that sums up my meditations!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AllGT View Post
    In 2000, the Baltimore Ravens fielded one of the best defenses in the history of the NFL. The Ravens held their opponents to an NFL record 970 rushing yards (60.6 yards) that still stands today. Even with an all-time great defense, the Ravens barely made the playoffs that season as a wildcard entrant. The “problem” with the Ravens that season is the offense was uneven at best, and their starting QB, Trent Dilfer was a lightening rod for criticism. With one of the best RBs of his generation (Jamal Lewis) and a Hall of Fame tight end (Shannon Sharpe), the Ravens offense still sputtered along every week. The criticism of and Dilfer and the offense got so bad, it led the Raven’s talisman and superstar linebacker, Ray Lewis, to say “We don’t need Trent Dilfer to be an elite quarterback. If Trent can lead our offense to 14 points, we (the defense) will win the game because we have an elite defense” during an interview before the playoffs. True to Lewis’s word, the Raven’s defense held their playoff opponents to 3 points (21-3 win against Broncos), 10 points (24-10 win against the Titans), 3 points (16-3 win against the Raiders), and 7 points (34-7 Super Bowl win over the Giants).

    Down 28-35 in the fourth quarter last Saturday, WR Jeff Green streaked down the field wide open. Tevin Washington saw Green then proceeded to under throw him. Although the ball was underthrown, Green still had the opportunity to make a play and help Tevin. Instead, the ball bounced off his hands, popped in the air, and led to an interception. A few plays later, Middle Tennessee’s offense would score and take 42-28 lead on us. Ball game.

    As I witnessed Tevin’s under throw to Green, I said to myself “Well, if that play doesn’t summarize Tevin’s GT career, I’m not sure any play does.” Just good enough to get there, but still requires help from a teammate to finish it off. That’s the crux of Tevin’s time at QB. Statistically, he’ll go down as a very good QB at GT, and as a good option QB in college football. But stats are cheap if it doesn’t lead to wins. The reality is GT is now 2-3. Unlike Trent Dilfer and the Ravens, Tevin doesn’t have an outstanding defense to lean on during times like Saturday when the offense scored 28 points which should be enough to win against a low level FBS team. Who on our offense should our opponents really be scared of? There’s no Demaryius Thomas, Jonathan Dwyer, Calvin Johnson, etc. It’s pretty much just Tevin right now, and if other guys on offense don’t help him out, and if our defense doesn’t play well, we are in trouble. When it’s 3rd/4th and long, is anyone really scared of Jeff Green/Darren Waller or Robby Godhigh/Orwin Smith running routes? Does anyone really feel safe with a lead of any kind against our defense anymore?

    I think it’s unfortunate that when we look back on Tevin’s career, we’ll think of games like Middle Tennessee, and Miami and how embarrassing those losses were. He’s represented us well, the guys on the team look at him as one of the leaders of the team, and he’s doing all he can to help the team on the field. Yet, his athletic limitations are evident, and even more obvious because it’s all on him right now and there’s not much to help him out on offense or defense.

    - - - - -

    I started following GT sports when I was in elementary school. I’m not from a family deeply rooted in athletics, so I had to discover the love for sports on my own. By the grace of God my new love of sports coincidentally dovetailed at the same time as GT’s Championship run under Bobby Ross and Shawn Jones, and during Bobby Cremins’s and Kenny Anderson’s run to the Final Four. All of my immediate family members went to GT (hence my name…AllGT), but none of them are avid GT sports fans like myself. My love of GT sports was strengthened through thousands of hours in the backyard pretending I was Shawn Jones throwing to stationary targets, and countless hours shooting basketballs under the driveway lights pretending I was Kenny Anderson.

    I’ve seen the highs (1990 National Championship) and the lows (the Bill Lewis era) when I was young. For the most part, GT football program has had reasonable success since then. Yet, throughout it all, there has always been one missing ingredient. During the O’Leary years, we had a championship caliber offense led by one of the best QBs in college football history, Joe Hamilton, and an offensive genius in Ralph Friedgen. During the Gailey years, we had one of the most gifted WRs to ever grace the field on any level, Calvin Johnson, but not the QB to take advantage of it. We also had a pretty good defense during Gailey’s years with Tenuta, but a below average offense. Gailey sent bushels of players to the NFL, yet none of it translated on the field at GT outside of the 2006 season.

    Now, we have someone that is widely considered as one of the best offensive tacticians in college football. Paul Johnson’s offense is so widely admired that coaches like Bill Belicheck and Urban Meyer are known to have picked his brains at one time. CPJ has spawned a cottage flexbone industry in coaching tapes, clinics, and message boards devoted to his offense. Yet, again, something is missing. We just can’t seem to attract the top tier athtletes that could take our offense from pretty good, to elite. Because GT is so known for CPJ and his offenses, when we lose like we did against Miami and Middle Tennessee, his offense is somehow blamed for it. That’s fair. Paul Johnson is getting paid to be the HEAD COACH, and not the offensive coordinator.

    What I’m trying to say, and the point I’m trying to make is this is how it is to be a GT fan these days. SOMETHING is always missing. If our strengths aren’t strong enough to overcome our weaknesses, days like Miami and Middle Tennessee happen. Are we living in the past? I became a GT fan during some golden times, but the landscape of modern sports has changed. Schools like GT can be good, but because of the various things which are too long and detailed to get into at the moment, things have to “dovetail” just right for us to be elite. We’re smack dab is the middle of one of the most recruiting rich areas in the nation, and we can’t take advantage of it. We’re an elite institution that attracts some of the top students in the world, but elite athletes that are elite students are few and far between. We’re located in one of the signature cities in the US with plenty of internship and post graduate opportunities, but somehow that’s a negative for recruiting. We have some of the best facilities in all of college sports, yet even our own students don’t appreciate it.

    All the ingredients are there, but SOMETHING is always missing…
    Great post.I am of the opposite age group.I grew up under Dodd where it was expected to see Tech win every Saturday.We had few seven wins out of ten games but the competetion was so much tougher than today yet still tech would play well and win.I can remember the Drought Breaker Theron Sapp and still couldnt belive it happened but it did and of course everytime we would get beat by Ga we would come back and start a new streak.

    I miss the unifomity of Dodd.Everybody dressed alike.No high socks or blacks socks or frills on the unifroms like today.Every player looked the same and it appeared the team was the goal not the individual.Saturday saw one guy with high black socks when eveybody had white on.Makes me wonder.You are right with Ralphie and GOL it was fun to see a game in Grant Field.fYou knew LIttle Joe would do something to make us win and a ticket was hard to get .

    Dont worry seen it before and the Dodd luck did run out and PJ has no luck at all it seems.When the Hill gets tired of losing and the alums stop putting money on the table we will shake this off.GT is still a national treasure for engineering and it used to be a landmark for good football.We will do it again.................now when we do it is not clear but we will be back.We are the Brooklyn Dodgers of the ACC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AllGT View Post
    In 2000, the Baltimore Ravens fielded one of the best defenses in the history of the NFL. The Ravens held their opponents to an NFL record 970 rushing yards (60.6 yards) that still stands today. Even with an all-time great defense, the Ravens barely made the playoffs that season as a wildcard entrant. The “problem” with the Ravens that season is the offense was uneven at best, and their starting QB, Trent Dilfer was a lightening rod for criticism. With one of the best RBs of his generation (Jamal Lewis) and a Hall of Fame tight end (Shannon Sharpe), the Ravens offense still sputtered along every week. The criticism of and Dilfer and the offense got so bad, it led the Raven’s talisman and superstar linebacker, Ray Lewis, to say “We don’t need Trent Dilfer to be an elite quarterback. If Trent can lead our offense to 14 points, we (the defense) will win the game because we have an elite defense” during an interview before the playoffs. True to Lewis’s word, the Raven’s defense held their playoff opponents to 3 points (21-3 win against Broncos), 10 points (24-10 win against the Titans), 3 points (16-3 win against the Raiders), and 7 points (34-7 Super Bowl win over the Giants).

    Down 28-35 in the fourth quarter last Saturday, WR Jeff Green streaked down the field wide open. Tevin Washington saw Green then proceeded to under throw him. Although the ball was underthrown, Green still had the opportunity to make a play and help Tevin. Instead, the ball bounced off his hands, popped in the air, and led to an interception. A few plays later, Middle Tennessee’s offense would score and take 42-28 lead on us. Ball game.

    As I witnessed Tevin’s under throw to Green, I said to myself “Well, if that play doesn’t summarize Tevin’s GT career, I’m not sure any play does.” Just good enough to get there, but still requires help from a teammate to finish it off. That’s the crux of Tevin’s time at QB. Statistically, he’ll go down as a very good QB at GT, and as a good option QB in college football. But stats are cheap if it doesn’t lead to wins. The reality is GT is now 2-3. Unlike Trent Dilfer and the Ravens, Tevin doesn’t have an outstanding defense to lean on during times like Saturday when the offense scored 28 points which should be enough to win against a low level FBS team. Who on our offense should our opponents really be scared of? There’s no Demaryius Thomas, Jonathan Dwyer, Calvin Johnson, etc. It’s pretty much just Tevin right now, and if other guys on offense don’t help him out, and if our defense doesn’t play well, we are in trouble. When it’s 3rd/4th and long, is anyone really scared of Jeff Green/Darren Waller or Robby Godhigh/Orwin Smith running routes? Does anyone really feel safe with a lead of any kind against our defense anymore?

    I think it’s unfortunate that when we look back on Tevin’s career, we’ll think of games like Middle Tennessee, and Miami and how embarrassing those losses were. He’s represented us well, the guys on the team look at him as one of the leaders of the team, and he’s doing all he can to help the team on the field. Yet, his athletic limitations are evident, and even more obvious because it’s all on him right now and there’s not much to help him out on offense or defense.

    - - - - -

    I started following GT sports when I was in elementary school. I’m not from a family deeply rooted in athletics, so I had to discover the love for sports on my own. By the grace of God my new love of sports coincidentally dovetailed at the same time as GT’s Championship run under Bobby Ross and Shawn Jones, and during Bobby Cremins’s and Kenny Anderson’s run to the Final Four. All of my immediate family members went to GT (hence my name…AllGT), but none of them are avid GT sports fans like myself. My love of GT sports was strengthened through thousands of hours in the backyard pretending I was Shawn Jones throwing to stationary targets, and countless hours shooting basketballs under the driveway lights pretending I was Kenny Anderson.

    I’ve seen the highs (1990 National Championship) and the lows (the Bill Lewis era) when I was young. For the most part, GT football program has had reasonable success since then. Yet, throughout it all, there has always been one missing ingredient. During the O’Leary years, we had a championship caliber offense led by one of the best QBs in college football history, Joe Hamilton, and an offensive genius in Ralph Friedgen. During the Gailey years, we had one of the most gifted WRs to ever grace the field on any level, Calvin Johnson, but not the QB to take advantage of it. We also had a pretty good defense during Gailey’s years with Tenuta, but a below average offense. Gailey sent bushels of players to the NFL, yet none of it translated on the field at GT outside of the 2006 season.

    Now, we have someone that is widely considered as one of the best offensive tacticians in college football. Paul Johnson’s offense is so widely admired that coaches like Bill Belicheck and Urban Meyer are known to have picked his brains at one time. CPJ has spawned a cottage flexbone industry in coaching tapes, clinics, and message boards devoted to his offense. Yet, again, something is missing. We just can’t seem to attract the top tier athtletes that could take our offense from pretty good, to elite. Because GT is so known for CPJ and his offenses, when we lose like we did against Miami and Middle Tennessee, his offense is somehow blamed for it. That’s fair. Paul Johnson is getting paid to be the HEAD COACH, and not the offensive coordinator.

    What I’m trying to say, and the point I’m trying to make is this is how it is to be a GT fan these days. SOMETHING is always missing. If our strengths aren’t strong enough to overcome our weaknesses, days like Miami and Middle Tennessee happen. Are we living in the past? I became a GT fan during some golden times, but the landscape of modern sports has changed. Schools like GT can be good, but because of the various things which are too long and detailed to get into at the moment, things have to “dovetail” just right for us to be elite. We’re smack dab is the middle of one of the most recruiting rich areas in the nation, and we can’t take advantage of it. We’re an elite institution that attracts some of the top students in the world, but elite athletes that are elite students are few and far between. We’re located in one of the signature cities in the US with plenty of internship and post graduate opportunities, but somehow that’s a negative for recruiting. We have some of the best facilities in all of college sports, yet even our own students don’t appreciate it.

    All the ingredients are there, but SOMETHING is always missing…
    Let's not forget that GT had two (2) lineman that were denied entrance into the masters program and had one (1) year of eligibilty left and had to transfer to GA State to finished playing football and get their degree. Sad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AllGT View Post
    In 2000, the Baltimore Ravens fielded one of the best defenses in the history of the NFL. The Ravens held their opponents to an NFL record 970 rushing yards (60.6 yards) that still stands today. Even with an all-time great defense, the Ravens barely made the playoffs that season as a wildcard entrant. The “problem” with the Ravens that season is the offense was uneven at best, and their starting QB, Trent Dilfer was a lightening rod for criticism. With one of the best RBs of his generation (Jamal Lewis) and a Hall of Fame tight end (Shannon Sharpe), the Ravens offense still sputtered along every week. The criticism of and Dilfer and the offense got so bad, it led the Raven’s talisman and superstar linebacker, Ray Lewis, to say “We don’t need Trent Dilfer to be an elite quarterback. If Trent can lead our offense to 14 points, we (the defense) will win the game because we have an elite defense” during an interview before the playoffs. True to Lewis’s word, the Raven’s defense held their playoff opponents to 3 points (21-3 win against Broncos), 10 points (24-10 win against the Titans), 3 points (16-3 win against the Raiders), and 7 points (34-7 Super Bowl win over the Giants).

    Down 28-35 in the fourth quarter last Saturday, WR Jeff Green streaked down the field wide open. Tevin Washington saw Green then proceeded to under throw him. Although the ball was underthrown, Green still had the opportunity to make a play and help Tevin. Instead, the ball bounced off his hands, popped in the air, and led to an interception. A few plays later, Middle Tennessee’s offense would score and take 42-28 lead on us. Ball game.

    As I witnessed Tevin’s under throw to Green, I said to myself “Well, if that play doesn’t summarize Tevin’s GT career, I’m not sure any play does.” Just good enough to get there, but still requires help from a teammate to finish it off. That’s the crux of Tevin’s time at QB. Statistically, he’ll go down as a very good QB at GT, and as a good option QB in college football. But stats are cheap if it doesn’t lead to wins. The reality is GT is now 2-3. Unlike Trent Dilfer and the Ravens, Tevin doesn’t have an outstanding defense to lean on during times like Saturday when the offense scored 28 points which should be enough to win against a low level FBS team. Who on our offense should our opponents really be scared of? There’s no Demaryius Thomas, Jonathan Dwyer, Calvin Johnson, etc. It’s pretty much just Tevin right now, and if other guys on offense don’t help him out, and if our defense doesn’t play well, we are in trouble. When it’s 3rd/4th and long, is anyone really scared of Jeff Green/Darren Waller or Robby Godhigh/Orwin Smith running routes? Does anyone really feel safe with a lead of any kind against our defense anymore?

    I think it’s unfortunate that when we look back on Tevin’s career, we’ll think of games like Middle Tennessee, and Miami and how embarrassing those losses were. He’s represented us well, the guys on the team look at him as one of the leaders of the team, and he’s doing all he can to help the team on the field. Yet, his athletic limitations are evident, and even more obvious because it’s all on him right now and there’s not much to help him out on offense or defense.

    - - - - -

    I started following GT sports when I was in elementary school. I’m not from a family deeply rooted in athletics, so I had to discover the love for sports on my own. By the grace of God my new love of sports coincidentally dovetailed at the same time as GT’s Championship run under Bobby Ross and Shawn Jones, and during Bobby Cremins’s and Kenny Anderson’s run to the Final Four. All of my immediate family members went to GT (hence my name…AllGT), but none of them are avid GT sports fans like myself. My love of GT sports was strengthened through thousands of hours in the backyard pretending I was Shawn Jones throwing to stationary targets, and countless hours shooting basketballs under the driveway lights pretending I was Kenny Anderson.

    I’ve seen the highs (1990 National Championship) and the lows (the Bill Lewis era) when I was young. For the most part, GT football program has had reasonable success since then. Yet, throughout it all, there has always been one missing ingredient. During the O’Leary years, we had a championship caliber offense led by one of the best QBs in college football history, Joe Hamilton, and an offensive genius in Ralph Friedgen. During the Gailey years, we had one of the most gifted WRs to ever grace the field on any level, Calvin Johnson, but not the QB to take advantage of it. We also had a pretty good defense during Gailey’s years with Tenuta, but a below average offense. Gailey sent bushels of players to the NFL, yet none of it translated on the field at GT outside of the 2006 season.

    Now, we have someone that is widely considered as one of the best offensive tacticians in college football. Paul Johnson’s offense is so widely admired that coaches like Bill Belicheck and Urban Meyer are known to have picked his brains at one time. CPJ has spawned a cottage flexbone industry in coaching tapes, clinics, and message boards devoted to his offense. Yet, again, something is missing. We just can’t seem to attract the top tier athtletes that could take our offense from pretty good, to elite. Because GT is so known for CPJ and his offenses, when we lose like we did against Miami and Middle Tennessee, his offense is somehow blamed for it. That’s fair. Paul Johnson is getting paid to be the HEAD COACH, and not the offensive coordinator.

    What I’m trying to say, and the point I’m trying to make is this is how it is to be a GT fan these days. SOMETHING is always missing. If our strengths aren’t strong enough to overcome our weaknesses, days like Miami and Middle Tennessee happen. Are we living in the past? I became a GT fan during some golden times, but the landscape of modern sports has changed. Schools like GT can be good, but because of the various things which are too long and detailed to get into at the moment, things have to “dovetail” just right for us to be elite. We’re smack dab is the middle of one of the most recruiting rich areas in the nation, and we can’t take advantage of it. We’re an elite institution that attracts some of the top students in the world, but elite athletes that are elite students are few and far between. We’re located in one of the signature cities in the US with plenty of internship and post graduate opportunities, but somehow that’s a negative for recruiting. We have some of the best facilities in all of college sports, yet even our own students don’t appreciate it.

    All the ingredients are there, but SOMETHING is always missing…
    And so it goes with Georgia Tech football. I am from the Bobby Dodd era and if you plan on hanging around Tech football for very long you will need the emergency kin. The kit should include the following. Plenty of liquor as talked about in our fight song, some very, very thick skin, something to pound on after a day like Saturday (maybe a toy bull dog), and a good bit of antacid.

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    Very good read and very well said. All of it is true. We are not unique though. Pretty much every program in the country can say the same thing. We are a little further from having all required components than some, but far closer than the majority. Through it all we have managed consistency in the last 15 or so years that most programs have not. The number of consecutive bowls reached leave us in select company. Say what you will how easy it is to get a bowl these days, but that field is level for everybody and we are one of the few that have actually done it. Still, we all desire more. I guess it hurts to be so tantalizingly close and never find the key ingredient. Put Lil Joe in Reggie Ball's shoes and we win a national championship under Gailey. Put Tenuta's defense on the 2009 team and we win another. Come to think of it, Lil Joe would have the 2012 version humming quite well too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomergump View Post
    Very good read and very well said. All of it is true. We are not unique though. Pretty much every program in the country can say the same thing. We are a little further from having all required components than some, but far closer than the majority. Through it all we have managed consistency in the last 15 or so years that most programs have not. The number of consecutive bowls reached leave us in select company. Say what you will how easy it is to get a bowl these days, but that field is level for everybody and we are one of the few that have actually done it. Still, we all desire more. I guess it hurts to be so tantalizingly close and never find the key ingredient. Put Lil Joe in Reggie Ball's shoes and we win a national championship under Gailey. Put Tenuta's defense on the 2009 team and we win another. Come to think of it, Lil Joe would have the 2012 version humming quite well too.
    So would Vad Lee!
    BAD VAD LEE

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    Quote Originally Posted by TECH61 View Post
    So would Vad Lee!
    I hope you are right and I have a feeling he will. If TW was a junior I feel very sure that at some point Vad would push him to the sidelines. It could still happen this year.

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    The offense is to blame for it. It is to blame, because it is the essence of the team, and the brainchild of this much-admired coach. The coach that has continually quipped that the team with the most points wins, while continually allowing the defense to play like high schoolers. You cannot tell me that, with your vast experience watching Tech football, that the offense has been clicking for 12 or 15 games. We looked good against Presbyterian and UVA, but we all know what that is worth. We showed up for Clempsen last year. And that is it for the last dozen games. We know the defense is suspect. We know we can't leave them out there for 55 plays--not even against MTSU. If we are to win, it has to be on offense, and the offense is terrible and has been for about the last 15 games.

 

 
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