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Solving a Georgia Tech Football Mystery

This is a discussion on Solving a Georgia Tech Football Mystery within the Georgia Tech Football forums, part of the Georgia Tech Sports Message Boards category; Something I've always wondered is how an individual can get an MBA at Harvard in a year but it takes ...

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    Solving a Georgia Tech Football Mystery

    Something I've always wondered is how an individual can get an MBA at Harvard in a year but it takes a couple years or more for a Georgia Tech QB to learn how to effectively run and execute Paul Johnson's offense.

    Anyone want to take a stab at solving the mystery?


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    And this is a prevalent offense among high schools...if its do damn hard, why do they run it? I always thought it was because its easier for a QB to learn to read a DE than a secondary and deliver an accurate pass. I know I am probably way over simplifying it, but isn't that a simple read? At least easy enough to learn after a year of reps? I have never understood it either. We installed the triple O my senior year in HS in the middle of the season and ran it well, granted HS Ds are more limited than what a collegiate D will throw at you. And how in the hell is it so hard to take a snap...after a year of practice?!

    It's like when I hear people talk about how hard the mesh is to get down...it's not hard at all. I learned it in a week and had no issues. That's just my experience in white boy HS football but the same principles apply...the football is just a little bigger.
    Last edited by HelluvaMGTmjr; 04-27-2012 at 10:41 AM.

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    Running the TO from under center with the speed of the college game makes it a steep learning curve for young QB's. Making the split second reads requires tons of reps and tons of "muscle memory". It is much more difficult to make these decisions close to the line of scrimmage then sitting back in a shotgun and reading DB's. Marist runs the TO and they groom those kids from 7th grade on. It is a very effective offense and is perfect for the kind of athletes we get at GT but requires a lot of reps and concentration.

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    It must be as you say. I'm certainly not questioning CPJ, he's the 3-0 guru for sure and has taught dozens and dozens of QBs the system. It just boggles my mind that it's so hard to learn.

    I still cant believe it's easier to read an entire defense and 2ndary and make your progressions to find an open WR while bodies are flying at you and around you than it is to read one player under more static circumstances.

    And the snap thing...I just don't get it. Oh well.

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    The reason it is so effective is the VERY fast decision making and reaction it takes for the defense-otoh-it takes a HUGE amount of time to perfect the timing and coordination.

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    I'm sure speed of reads and footwork have something to do with it. Plus, we have a lot of different reads depending on which variation of the option we are running that play. Add to that the things Ds do to try and disguise their movements and you have a fairly complicated task list. However, on the surface it doesn't sound any more difficult than reading secondaries etc etc in the passing game. Who knows? I would suck at QB anyways. I don't know how those guys can do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hart View Post
    Something I've always wondered is how an individual can get an MBA at Harvard in a year but it takes a couple years or more for a Georgia Tech QB to learn how to effectively run and execute Paul Johnson's offense.

    Anyone want to take a stab at solving the mystery?
    Maybe it's coming to accept 270 pound defensive ends or linebackers looking to rip your head from your shoulders vs. figuring out which demitasse to choose? Always gave me second thoughts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curious View Post
    Maybe it's coming to accept 270 pound defensive ends or linebackers looking to rip your head from your shoulders vs. figuring out which demitasse to choose? Always gave me second thoughts.
    NOw you are talking.When I coached the defense and we ran into a veer or option we got in a fifty and split both ends out three yds from the offensive end or tackle at a angle and he got into a three point stance and blew off the tackle or ends outside hip and he would meet the qb about the guard hole.Something has to give and I still think it takes a special type guy to run this offense.Most folks I see are in the spread now rather than behind center.It will take some getting used to and some........bruises to run it effectively.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hart View Post
    Something I've always wondered is how an individual can get an MBA at Harvard in a year but it takes a couple years or more for a Georgia Tech QB to learn how to effectively run and execute Paul Johnson's offense.

    Anyone want to take a stab at solving the mystery?
    natural dual-threat QBs don't need numerous years to get it down. tracy ham didn't. raymond gross didn't. greg hill didn't. JR revere didn't. they also had pretty decent OLs, too. that's a BIG key!

    back to the QBs--(JN was) and TW is a one dimensional QB. when all a D really has to do is stuff the box, it makes everything that much tougher to execute cause you're relying so heavily on one facet of this offense and the D is hellbent on stopping that one facet cause they don't have to worry about being beat through the air. yeah, we had some success through the air in '09 with bay bay. but, that's the outlier so far.

    we get a true passer in this system who can genuinely keep D's honest--else, they'll get their asses burned through the air--and, making those run reads will be easier cause the D won't have every soul within 7 yards of the QB at the snap.
    Last edited by stonedwall; 04-27-2012 at 02:41 PM.

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    I don't think it's super difficult the way some people describe it. Some guys obviously are going to have more of a natural aptitude for it than others, but, for the most part, it's teachable.

    The main thing is getting them to recognize who their reads are. Then you just rep the hell out of it until it's muscle memory.
    Getting them to react to a "hot" or blitzing outside linebacker takes a lot of conscious work to get it to the point that it becomes unconscious, for instance.

    I don't think it's necessarily a tougher offense to learn than some of the junkier shotgun spreads out there.
    By "junkier" I mean those offenses that are a sort of mishmash of different spread concepts thrown together. I see this at the collegiate level sometimes - it's almost as if the college OCs are actually listening to message board guys who want to see the Atomic Nuclear Flamethrower Wildcat Spread; short passing game, deep concepts, a little run and shoot, some zone read option, some power running, some misdirection, some X, Y, and Z. "Evolved" "Diverse" "Spread" buzzword buzzword buzzword.

    Our offense - like June Jones' or RichRod's etc - has some core philosophical concepts that everything else builds on. That's easier to package and teach than the ANFWS Offense (tm).

    I think when people talk about, for instance, Vad "actually getting a few reads right" they're being hyperbolic. My worst QB was probably 60-65% on his reads. That's minor league football with very little time to work on them. Yes, FBS defenders are better, but I wouldn't expect any of our QBs to be worse than 70% on a bad day. We generally expect them to be at 80-85%, IMO.

 

 
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